Tips For Confronting A Risky Older Driver – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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If you have an older patient, client or loved one whose driving concerns you, you are not alone.  Most of us struggle with talking about dangerous driving with older patients, clients and loved ones.  Just getting older involves physical and cognitive changes that can impact road safety.

Check out Jennifer FitzPatrick’s first international radio appearance discussing tips about this issue with Gord Gillies on News Talk 770 Calgary https://omny.fm/shows/the-morning-news-with-gord-gillies/seniors-driving .

 

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

5 Tips To Help You Live Happily Ever After At Home For The Rest Of Your Life – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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Nobody’s first choice is to live in a nursing home. Most people prefer not to move in with adult children or other loved ones either. Even if an older adult is open to the idea of a CCRC (continuing care retirement community) or assisted living, they are very expensive options. Aging in place is often considered the most cost-effective option for those who are healthy. Though many older adults will eventually reside in senior living residences, most would prefer to live at home for as long as possible. Here are 5 tips to help you do just that:

  1. Choose your home for aging in place carefully. Living near reputable healthcare institutions and providers you trust is crucial. Having a social support system nearby is also vital. Finally, having a bedroom and bathroom on the first floor is a huge help. Many older adults opt to move into a rancher or a condo with an elevator so navigating stairs will never be an issue. While this is a great strategy, some older persons want to remain in their “forever home” indefinitely. Remaining in the multi-story home in which you raised your family is a viable option if there is a bedroom and bathroom on the first floor. If an older person becomes less ambulatory, these features make the difference between being able to age in place or not. Ideally, the older person living in a multi-story home will also have the laundry machine on the first floor as well.
  2. Understand normal aging and prepare for it. In order to age in place successfully, it helps to understand the normal aging process. All of our senses and organs become a bit less efficient. Even when no disease or abnormal conditions are present, all of us experience these changes. For example, all older adults are more at risk for falls because of diminished reaction time which happens to everyone. Older adults desiring to age in place should be mindful of anything that would exacerbate fall risk in the private home: throw rugs, dim lighting, clutter, etc.
  3. Join or start a Village. Villages are grass-roots community based organizations that help support members who wish to age in place. To find out if there is one in your community or how to start one, check out www.vtvnetwork.org.
  4. Embrace technology. Life Alert systems are quite effective in detecting falls, especially the ones that are waterproof and can be worn in the bath or shower. Wearable technologies like Jawbone Up, Fitbit and Lively Safety Watch can allow family members to track some of the older person’s health habits. For example, the family member and older person aging in place can both wear the Jawbone Up or Fitbit, link their accounts and see data like how many steps the other person has taken or the quality of the other person’s sleep. Not only does this increase information that family has about an older loved one’s lifestyle but it may encourage the older person to be less sedentary and embrace better sleep habits. The Lively Safety Watch includes sensors that can be attached to the refrigerator and other objects in the home (e.g. a bathroom door) to determine how often the older person has been eating or when she uses the restroom.
  5. Look into home care options now. You may not need help with chores or taking a shower right today but someday you might.  Get to know the home care options in your community early—before you need home care services.

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

How to Spot Red Flags of Clients at Risk for Exploitation – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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Suzanne has been 82- year old Mr. Burns’ financial planner for the last seventeen years.  Mr. Burns has been very conservative with his investments and has never made a large withdrawal from his account.  Today, Mr. Burns calls to say he would like to liquidate his account so he can travel across Europe with his new 28-year old girlfriend.  Suzanne is perplexed by this—she has never known Mr. Burns to go on a vacation other than to visit his daughter who lives a few hours away.  This is also the first time Suzanne has ever heard about a new girlfriend.

Everything might be just fine with Mr. Burns; perhaps he has finally gotten the travel bug and has genuinely fallen in love.  On the other hand, this new behavior could indicate a change in cognitive status.

Many people understand that Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias include short term memory loss.  But what so many don’t understand is that unusual behavior, personality changes, lack of inhibition and getting lost in familiar places can also be red flags.

While financial planners advise and guide their clients, ultimately the client has a right to do what he wants.  Even though Suzanne may express concern about his liquidation request, she ultimately would have to follow his order. That’s why I am thrilled that FINRA has established these new rules to protect the older investor as well as the financial planner:

https://www.finra.org/sites/default/files/Regulatory-Notice-17-11.pdf

Beginning in February 2018, planners will have some options in cases like this.  Suzanne could put a temporary hold on Mr. Burns’ account.  She could also contact Mr. Burns’ trusted contact person who is listed on his account.  These rules offer the financial planner peace of mind when dealing with a client situation that feels “off.”

Once Suzanne exercises these options, it’s possible that it will be determined that Mr. Burns is cognitively intact. Maybe Mr. Burns knows exactly what he is doing and it will all work out fine.  He and the new girlfriend will live happily ever after backpacking across Europe.  Or perhaps Mr. Burns is being exploited and he will end up losing his life savings through a scam perpetuated by the new girlfriend.

With the implementation of these new rules, it is quite possible that Suzanne could save Mr. Burns and his family from the heartache of poor decisions made under the influence of dementia.

If you are a financial planner who wants more information about how to spot red flags of clients at risk for exploitation, join me for a webinar on the topic approved by the CFP Board: Thursday Dec 7–To register, click on http://jenerationshealth.com/online-events. I will also be on Sirius XM this week discussing this topic on Business Radio Channel 111 at 5pm EST on December 5.

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

Who Will Take Care of You When You’re Old? – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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My husband and I don’t have kids. Finally, now that we are in our mid-forties, people have stopped asking when we will. But for a very long time, when we indicated that we didn’t have children, people—even strangers—would inquire, “But who will be there for you when you get older?” Frequently my response was, “We have long term care insurance,” with a smile. That usually shut down the conversation.

Of course, such discussions have always reminded me that our older adulthood will differ from peers who will have adult children, grandchildren and possibly even great-grandchildren. While having children does not guarantee anyone a caregiver someday, we know that we may have less social support than other older adults.

Because of this, when I first heard about Joy Loverde’s new book Who Will Take Care of Me When I’m Old?, I immediately said to my husband, “We need this book.” I’m thrilled to report that this book is much more than what I was expecting. While Loverde recognizes our situation, she also reminds the reader that thinking ahead about who will support you in old age is not just an issue for the childless. Even those with many adult children should be proactive in developing a robust social network for their later years.

Loverde covers practical ideas such as how to become better at socializing (even if you consider yourself shy) so you can enjoy more social support. She also offers provocative ideas like having a funeral before you die. Repeatedly while reading Who Will Take Care of Me When I’m Old, I found myself thinking, “I never thought of that before!”

Though I was initially personally interested in Who Will Take Care of Me When I’m Old, professionally I wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone who wants to have a more fulfilling aging experience.

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

What do you do about sex…and dementia? By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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How should senior living communities handle residents who have dementia who are “sexually aggressive?”  What do spouses and partners do about their sexual needs if their loved one has dementia?  Can somebody with Alzheimer’s disease or another cognitive impairment say “yes” to sex?  Check out Jen’s recent interview on Valda Ford’s Sex Is Not For Sissies show where we explore these complex questions:

http://www.spreaker.com/user/9496980/sept-11-jennifer-fitzpatrick

 

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.