Is Reverse Ageism A Problem In Your Workplace? By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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You wouldn’t dream of making racist or sexist remarks in the workplace, right?  So why do some workplaces tolerate ageist comments? Older adults are no strangers to this phenomenon but reverse ageism is now impacting younger employees in the workplace.  Check out Jen’s new video on how to handle reverse ageism in the workplace:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMMZ62S7Kc4&t=143s

 

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

Three Tips Healthcare Leaders Should Emphasize Daily To Employees Of All Generations – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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  1. Think beyond HIPPA and confidentiality.  While medical staff training always includes HIPPA and confidentiality information, it is never emphasized enough.  Confidentiality rules are broken every day in every healthcare and medical practice settings.  But beyond emphasizing basic HIPPA/confidentiality, help staff understand that talking about a case without using a name is often a violation.  Particularly in small communities, often others will be able to figure out who you are talking about if they know where you work.
  2. Be cautious about social media.  It’s never OK to vent about your boss, job or your patients on social media…even if you don’t use their names.
  3. Be sensitive to age diversity.  Communicate with patients and their caregivers the way they like to be communicated with.  There are 5 adult generations currently working in healthcare.  Clinical outcomes will be improved when you cater to the way a patient likes to communicate (e.g. a phone call rather than an e-mail for an 80-year old Traditionalist).  On the other hand, Millennials and Generation Z don’t always answer a phone call.  Try to communicate with patients and their caregivers the way they want to be communicated with while always being mindful of HIPPA and confidentiality.

 

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

Are You Generationally Sensitive To The Senior Living Buyer? – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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The generation in which we are raised impacts how we see the world, communicate and make purchasing decisions. For a very long time, senior living marketing and sales staff have focused their efforts on impressing our oldest generations: the Traditionalists and Baby Boomers.

As a senior living marketing or salesperson, are you aware that more Millennials are caregiving than ever before?  AARP reports that about 25% of all caregivers are currently of the Millennial generation.  What have you done to gain better insight into the minds of these younger adult child shoppers of senior living? The features and benefits that appeal to Baby Boomers and their parents may be perceived very differently by Generation X and Millennials.

What values are common for Generation X and Millennials? What is most important to them?  What are their expectations? With the changing senior living landscape, understanding how to shift strategies when working with buyers of different age groups is essential.   How are you keeping current?  Jenerations can help you better understand senior living shoppers of different generations; please click here for more information: http://jenerationshealth.com/keynotes/

 

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

Why Sensitivity to Diversity Needs to Include Generational Awareness – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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Age diversity in today’s workplace is a reality that many of us find uncomfortable.

If you are a Baby Boomer, you may find yourself complaining about younger colleagues who insist on texting you when you prefer to talk the issue out.  If you are a Millennial you may be tired of the older generations at work underestimating you, their constant need to meet in person and their reluctance to embrace working from home.  We have more age diversity in the workplace than ever before. Lots of people in their seventies and even eighties (Traditionalists) are still employed; some because they enjoy their jobs while others can’t afford to retire quite yet.  But mostly we have a mix of Millennials, Generation X and Baby Boomers dominating the workforce.  Generation Y, the generation younger than Millennials, have just begun their careers.

People are often more comfortable relating to and working with those who are similar. But welcoming age diversity offers us access to different opinions, new problem-solving techniques and perspectives we may never before have considered.  Since most organizations also serve persons of different age groups, embracing age diversity in our colleagues will help us understand and meet the needs our customers, clients and patients better.

If you need help with understanding and embracing age diversity in your organization, check out Jennifer FitzPatrick’s workshop and keynote programs focused on generational awareness:  http://jenerationshealth.com/keynotes/.  We’d love to work with you!

 

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

How To Stress Less When Different Generations Live Together

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Decades ago, it was common for 2, 3 and even 4 generations to cohabitate. While it’s less common now, moving in with family members of other generations still occurs because of caregiving, culture, financial issues or logistical reasons like relocation. Here are three tips for making the experience as low stress as possible:

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