Who Will Take Care of You When You’re Old? – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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My husband and I don’t have kids. Finally, now that we are in our mid-forties, people have stopped asking when we will. But for a very long time, when we indicated that we didn’t have children, people—even strangers—would inquire, “But who will be there for you when you get older?” Frequently my response was, “We have long term care insurance,” with a smile. That usually shut down the conversation.

Of course, such discussions have always reminded me that our older adulthood will differ from peers who will have adult children, grandchildren and possibly even great-grandchildren. While having children does not guarantee anyone a caregiver someday, we know that we may have less social support than other older adults.

Because of this, when I first heard about Joy Loverde’s new book Who Will Take Care of Me When I’m Old?, I immediately said to my husband, “We need this book.” I’m thrilled to report that this book is much more than what I was expecting. While Loverde recognizes our situation, she also reminds the reader that thinking ahead about who will support you in old age is not just an issue for the childless. Even those with many adult children should be proactive in developing a robust social network for their later years.

Loverde covers practical ideas such as how to become better at socializing (even if you consider yourself shy) so you can enjoy more social support. She also offers provocative ideas like having a funeral before you die. Repeatedly while reading Who Will Take Care of Me When I’m Old, I found myself thinking, “I never thought of that before!”

Though I was initially personally interested in Who Will Take Care of Me When I’m Old, professionally I wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone who wants to have a more fulfilling aging experience.

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

Why You Need to Buy Into the Age Diversity Movement – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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My most requested keynote title for healthcare conferences is called Navigating Communication With Different Generations: Reducing Drama And Conflict In Healthcare.  Why?  I believe it’s because many of us still haven’t bought into the concept that generational affiliation is just another way we are diverse.  Does generational affiliation define anyone?  No!  But it does influence how we think and communicate.  This goes for patients, caregivers and colleagues in the healthcare workplace.

Another reason healthcare professionals are hungry for this discussion is because a large percentage are reporting that they themselves or others in their organization are experiencing ageism or reverse ageism.  Each time I provide this keynote, I poll the audience ahead of time.  I have not encountered an audience where this was not an issue.  If healthcare professionals feel ageism and reverse ageism from colleagues and managers, I can’t imagine that this doesn’t also impact our patients and their caregivers.

If you want to reduce drama and conflict in your healthcare workplace while providing better service to patients and clients, consider the acronym AGE.  Accept that generational diversity is part of what makes all of us unique.  Get real about your biases.  Many of us have bias against another generation.  Try to work through it and understand it.  If you stereotype a generation, educate yourself about the facts.  Finally, Expect commonalities among persons who are Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Gen X, Millennials and Gen Z.  Just know that generation doesn’t totally define them.

If your organization could benefit from a deeper dive into this topic, check out this page:  http://jenerationshealth.com/keynotes/

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

 

 

Is Reverse Ageism A Problem In Your Workplace? By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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You wouldn’t dream of making racist or sexist remarks in the workplace, right?  So why do some workplaces tolerate ageist comments? Older adults are no strangers to this phenomenon but reverse ageism is now impacting younger employees in the workplace.  Check out Jen’s new video on how to handle reverse ageism in the workplace:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMMZ62S7Kc4&t=143s

 

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

Want to better understand confusing legal issues when caregiving? Your no-jargon guide is finally here! – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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Several months ago I ran into Jamie, an old friend who is an engineer. She’s super-smart, has a big important job and went to a very prestigious university.  Once we reconnected and she realized that I work often with caregivers, she shared her frustration with the Medicaid system.  Jamie’s father was currently taking care of her mom who was eventually going to need nursing home care.  Jamie went on to tell me that her father couldn’t believe that he had to sell their house, their cars and everything they own to make sure his wife could get care.  Quickly I explained to Jamie that he does not—and that he should immediately consult an elder law attorney to discuss how to apply for Medicaid without going bankrupt.

This incident reminded me how many educated, intelligent Americans still don’t understand the basics of how to pay for care without going broke.  When I heard about Jamie and her dad struggling, I wish  Protecting Your Assets from Probate and Long-Term Care had been available.  Fortunately it is now!

Launched just this week, Protecting Your Assets from Probate and Long-Term Care by Evan H. Farr, CELA, finally explains everything one needs to know about complex legal and financial information in plain English.  If you or your loved one own a home or have any assets whatsoever, this book will help you avoid common costly mistakes paying for elder care for yourself or a loved one.

While every individual facing paying for long term care for self or others still should consider an individual consultation with an elder law attorney, reading Protecting Your Assets from Probate and Long-Term Care ahead of time will help caregivers prepare for the meeting, which will ultimately save money, energy and time.

To buy a copy of this new book or find out more information, check out:  https://www.amazon.com/Protecting-Your-Assets-Probate-Long-Term/dp/1621535533/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1495643340&sr=8-2&keywords=evan+farr

 

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.

Why We Need To Stop Thinking It’s OK To Bash Millennials – By Jennifer L. FitzPatrick

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Author Jennifer FitzPatrick and her husband Sean (Generation X) and Jen’s fabulous Millennial cousins and their Millennial significant others.

Can you imagine bashing someone of another race, religion or sexual orientation at work?  I sure hope not.  So why do some organizations sit by and allow their employees to bash persons based on their age?

Recently a team of Gen-Xers and Baby Boomers told me about a “problem employee” in their workplace.  They went on to describe this employee’s behavior as unprofessional, overly emotional, reactive, and self-centered.  When they offered examples to support these claims, I couldn’t help but agree that they certainly had a problem on their hands.  But I was floored when one member of this team said, “You know, he’s the typical Millennial.”  And then her boss nodded in agreement.

Huh?

The behavior the team described was certainly concerning.  Frankly, it sounded to me like the employee likely had traits consistent with an untreated personality disorder.  But typical of a Millennial?  No.

Millennials are simply a generation.  Sure, as a demographic they may seek work-life balance, telecommuting options and change jobs more frequently than other generations.  But they are most certainly not known to be destructive in the workplace.

If your organization is age-stereotyping—or worse, generation-bashing, what steps can you take today to be more inclusive?  Better understanding generations at work offers many benefits including increased productivity, profits and morale.

 

Jennifer L. FitzPatrick – MSW, LCSW-C, CSP
The founder of Jenerations Health Education, Inc., Jennifer FitzPatrick has over 20 years’ experience in healthcare and gerontology. The author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing The Stress of Caring For Your Loved One, she is also a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and an Education Consultant to the Alzheimer’s Association. She helps you reduce stress and increase productivity, morale and revenue. Jennifer and Cruising Through Caregiving have been featured in Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, The Huffington Post, Reader’s Digest, Univision and The Chicago Tribune. She has also appeared on ABC and Sirius XM.